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netlabelday on 05/21/2016 at 03:07AM

New compilation!

I didn't know exactly how to let you know about this, but yes... We're making a new promo compilation for FMA with music from the participating labels and it will be amazing. As you may know, this isn't the first time that we do something like this, because last year we made a lovely compilation (that you can download right here).

I can't tell you yet when it will be released, but... June. That's all you have to know by now.

 

Cheers, everyone. Remember that Netlabel Day 2016 is happening once again on July 14, but every day can be Netlabel Day. Support them and show your love to them!

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murmurintemporel on 05/09/2016 at 01:29PM

Some words about Murmure Intemporel

Hello !

I am Jean-Luc, the curator and owner of the Murmure Intemporel netlabel.

This label was created under the moniker Gronde Murmure by John Cobains (an American living in France) at the end of 2010. In 2011, John creates a new netlabel named Sillage Intemporel, curated by a long time friend Jean Dechartres.

Gronde Murmure was mainly specialised in avant-garde musics (acousmatic, post-concrete, electroacoustic) and Sillage Intemporel was more oriented into electronic musics (ambient, electro, abstract electronic). In 2012, John merges the two netlabels in one entity named Murmure Intemporel (the logo was given by Zreen Toyz, one of the main artists of the netlabel).

Sadly, Jean Dechartres passed away in 2015. John and Jean are my friends for over twenty years, so when John ask me to replace Jean, I say yes immediately. At the end of 2015, John decides to retire in USA for living near his children and grandchildren; so I became the new owner of Murmure Intemporel.

Now, I will upload the catalogue of the netlabel (from 2011 to 2015), and the more recent releases (2016) will be notified on the Murmure Intemporel's blog.

Thanks to Cheyenne Hohman who accepted Murmure Intemporel at the Free Music Archive. 

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Stevecombsmusic on 05/06/2016 at 02:03PM

Big Juan

A pretty polite comment, I thought.

Hey FMA'ers. I've had an interesting day.

I'm used to people using my music in their projects. In fact at this point, I expect it. It would be weird if they didn't. Out of the roughly 250k downloads my songs have gotten, I'd bet at least half of them were for use in a video, on a podcast, or for a school project. And I love and am so grateful to everyone who does this because without it, I probably wouldn't be doing this anymore. To be honest, I think the FMA made my career what it is, and I owe it and the whole free culture community so much. That said, there is a limit to the freedom of my culture.

I woke up at around 11am this morning, because I'm a college student, and saw a couple of Twitter notifications (@stevecombsmusic, by the way). A German fan, @ruhpkid, tweeted at me to say that some guy named Big Juan put a copyright claim on a YouTube video of his in which he used my song, More Or Less OK, from my new album Riotwhich is available here on the FMA. Ruhpkid gave me credit and was generally wonderful. But Big Juan was claiming that my song was his song, Equalizer. At first I didn't think anything of it, that it was just a misguided attempt at stealing royalties or something. The joke would be on him, of course, since I don't get any kind of royalties. But I did a Google search for "Equalizer by Big Juan" and found the song on YouTube.

That's when I got angry.

I hear the first three seconds, which is the same opening drum fill as my song, and think "Well, maybe he just sampled it and forgot to give credit." But it quickly became clear that that wasn't the case. This wasn't a sample, this was a theft. Big Juan literally downloaded my song, changed the title, and put it on YouTube as his own.



READ MORE
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cheyenne_h on 05/05/2016 at 09:00AM

Radio Free Culture #67: Archiving the Spoken Word with Jemma Brown and Michael Guerra

Jemma Brown & Michael Guerra from The Moth. Photos used with permission.

WFMU and the Free Music Archive are proud to bring you a fresh episode of Radio Free Culture, a podcast exploring issues at the intersection of digital culture and the arts.

In this episode, Cheyenne Hohman, RFC host and current Director of the FMA, was joined by Jemma Brown and Michael Guerra from The Moth, a storytelling podcast and event series. They came to discuss the recently unveiled transcription tool, "Together We Listen" developed by NYPL Labs and The Moth using Pop Up Archive technology, with the help of a Knight Foundation prototype grant. This tool turns transcription editing into a game, crowdsourcing edits and making stories more accessible to hearing impaired individuals, one word at a time. 

Jemma Rose Brown is a the Digital Media Producer at The Moth where she creates web content, manages social platforms and leads digital strategy initiatives. Michael Guerra is the Media & Archives Manager at The Moth. To participate in their transcription intiative, "StoryScribe," visit http://storyscribe.themoth.org/.

Check out the podcast at WFMU, PRX, or subscribe to the Radio Free Culture on iTunes!

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